7 Most Common Problems with CFMOTO ZForce 800 Trail

The CFMOTO ZForce 800 is more than your usual Chinese four-wheeler, thanks to KTM’s production partner, CF Moto. It’s a great utility vehicle that can compete with ATVs from the top brands.

Engine sounds, component failure, and ordinary wear and tear are among them. Check the rear lower A-arms and engine brakes if you’re buying a secondhand ZForce 800. If the CVT belt needs to be replaced, make sure to examine it as well.

Read these most Common Problems with Textron Prowler Pro in details below.

Common Problems with CFMOTO ZForce 800 Trail:

1. Unusual Acceleration

At low speeds, the CFMOTO ZForce engine is consistently excellent, which is a bummer. Newcomers should verify whether their ZForce has faulty gas or a defective throttle position sensor, or if they ride in highly dusty locations, according to experienced owners.

The first-line inspection would consist of checking the valve, fuel lines, stock air filter, and fuel filter. If no problems are discovered, seek assistance from your local dealer.

Idle speed difficulties might develop unpredictably when electrical components are turned on or the voltage is too high. Unfortunately, owing to the vehicle’s fuel injection technology, there is no way to alter engine idle speed, thus adjustments must be made at the manufacturer.

2. Starting and Braking

This problem causes the engine to either not rotate or to rotate but not start. Error codes P0122 and P0351-P0352 are occasionally associated with the problem. A no-start problem is usually caused by a low ignition circuit or ECM voltage, a weak battery, or insufficient voltage reaching the coils.

It might also be due to a lack of oil in the engine (say, after you tear the air filter box to be able to add a snorkel on your quad). Check the cable connections and the main fuse, and then crank the engine to verify whether the voltage is less than 12V before and after the fuse.

The right remedy, however, is to bleed the brakes (to remove all the air) and replace the braking fluid. These two basic measures can dramatically boost your quad’s stopping power. Not to mention that they are simple and cost-effective solutions.

3. Engine Troubles

Valvetrain, connecting rod/bearing, pressure sensor, or oil filter difficulties can all cause loud banging or rattling noises. If your engine noise is considerable, it is advisable not to try to restart the machine. Investigate the source of the engine noise, and be ready to get your quad dragged down in the process.

Make sure there are no metal flakes or other types of obstructions in the oil filter. If your four-wheeler was recently rebuilt, the rattling sound is most likely the consequence of poor or faulty components, or the prior builder messing something up during the previous rebuild.

Starting issues might also be caused by not fully cleaning your wheeler after mudding. If the clutch plate is loose, this might sometimes be the source of the problem.

4. Power Issues

Fuel deprivation seems to be the trigger for most riders, although this isn’t always the case. To identify the fuel problem and establish if you are receiving a lean/rich mixture, start the engine with the air filter off and spray carb cleaning (or its equivalent) in the throttle body.

The engine should start if you follow the steps above. Pull the plugs and perform a compression test if it doesn’t but you’re receiving spark. To remove the rear plugs, you’ll need a deep sparkplug socket.

Remove the cap from the tank and turn the key to turn it on (the fuel pump should run a bit then shut off). Check the vent and make sure the tank’s valve isn’t trapped shut if it starts.

5. Suspension Problem

The incidence of this problem is best explained by a fault in the lower rear A-arms. A hole in the lower rear A-arms bushing tube, according to CFMOTO dealers, causes grease to migrate away from the (inside) bushing into the A-arm frame for all 800-class CFMOTO models.

Although this is a known problem, all A-arms are built the same way, leaving dealers with no replacement or fix for the issue reported by unit owners. The quick repair is to lubricate these components before each ride. CFMOTO ultimately issued a bulletin saying that repairs to the problematic lower A-arms would be covered.

Check any new CFMOTO ZForce purchases to see whether the lower A-arm problem has been resolved. It will be in your best interests to know how to cope with this situation if you chance to acquire a used device.

6. Steering Problem

When a tire strikes anything hard, and EPS sensor shuts off, preventing the EPS from working. This problem, on the other hand, maybe simply resolved by replacing the ECM. Others are interested in the shifter connection.

The problem can be solved by replacing the ECM, but it can also be solved by changing how you operate the controls. Maintain little pressure on the shifter when getting on and off the throttle when shifting to low.

The shifter snicks into gear this manner never pops back out and makes annoying grinding noises. Recognizing the sensation of the shifter nicking into low is also beneficial.

7. Overheating

This is a problem that affects practically all 4x4s, particularly purpose-built ATVs and UTVs. The more activities a quad can perform, the easier it is to overwork the engine and ignore its maintenance, causing it to overheat.

In general, a blocked coolant line, a filthy radiator fan, a damaged water pump, or a cooling system leak can prevent heat from escaping the CFMOTO ZForce 800 engine compartment.

Using high gear for long periods of sluggish driving or towing can cause the clutch system to overheat and harm engine components. Other CFMOTO ZForce 800 difficulties include loud exhaust or shock absorber noises, excessive oil consumption or low oil pressure, engine oil whitening, CVT belt wear, and other EFI issues.

What Majority of the Users Feel About CFMOTO ZForce 800 Trail?

While this article concentrates on the issues, it appears that half (if not the majority) of them do not affect more experienced, seasoned riders. In a sense, avoiding these problems and getting the most out of the quad’s dependability necessitates a certain amount of technical knowledge and expertise.

On many forums, users have expressed their opinions on the CFMOTO ZForce 800 Trails. Here are a few of the evaluations I’ve come across that you might appreciate.

“For me, my ZForce is very reliable and no other trails machines perform better for my style of riding. I am very happy with it! I will take the time to improve the comfort in the next week. 70% of my mileage has been made in winter on snow trail.”

Hrc630 from CF Moto Forum

“I have a 2015 and have had no real issues with it although there were a few small things like a-arm bushings and the intake has to be relocated for the amount of dust in my area. Pretty satisfied especially now that I have the Bandit shocks and springs. The newer ones have most of the bugs worked out and with good care and a splash of common sense.”

– NM Kawier Rider from CF Moto Forum

Fortunately, there is a multitude of online training, forums, and assistance from the riding community available to new owners. However, it would be beneficial if CFMOTO included comprehensive troubleshooting advice in all of their vehicle models’ service manuals.

I’ve noticed that the CFMOTO Terralander 800’s owner’s handbook includes specific procedures for resolving frequent difficulties, however, the CFMOTO ZForce 800’s owner’s manual does not.

Final Thoughts

Consumers have mixed feelings about the CFMOTO ZForce 800s, and no one is to blame. All of this good and negative input is based on personal experiences and provides a strong foundation for reaching conclusions about the 44. The CFMOTO ZForce is a solid quad in general. It will reliably serve any rider for many years on the trails if properly cared for and maintained. These four-wheelers feature a high-quality, utilitarian design that makes them ideal weekend trips as well as workhorses.

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